Searching Tags: 2018
  • An Earthology of Moving Landforms - Linz AMRO 2018

    Recent space imaging developments have given rise to a spread of commercial services based on the temporal dimensions of satellite imagery. Marketed under umbrella terms such as environmental intelligence, real-time Earth observation or orbital insight, these imaging projects deliver the surface of the planet as an image flow encoded into video streams, where change and variation become a commodified resource on the one hand, as well as a visual spectacle on the other.

    Postprocessed by computer vision and machine learning algorithms, these services extend the geospatial logic of GIS systems to the surface of the image. Paths become trackable, objects classificable and movements predictable. Seen from the satellite networks, the surfaces of the planet are imaged as visual feeders for data-extractive algorithms. As aerial images become data, then, the Earth is operationalised as a legible screen, where the predicted predates the perceived.

    This workshop proposes to examine the use of video prediction techniques based on machine learning within this imaging context of the transformations of landscape. It seeks to explore the cinematic character of some of the active landforms of the planet, such as river thalwegs, drifting glaciers or crawling dunes. This way, the workshop will present the capacity to generate video-predicted landscapes as a platform to speculate with this particular entanglement between visual media and the surfaces of the planet, beyond the extractive and finantial contexts that have given rise to it.

    The workshop is part of an ongoing research on the image character and temporality of the planetary surfaces developed together with Jussi Parikka and the Archaeologies of Media and Technology group.

    Link to the workshop: Art Meet Radical Openness AMRO 18

  • Surface Value and Landscape Prediction, Transmediale 2018, Berlin

    Aerial views of the ground for mapping, control, or military exploitation have numerous forms of surface value: representational power, logistics, targeting, real-time surveillance, and mastery of space. This workshop elaborates on the double aspect of the screen as geographical and mediatic, as a material and epistemological part of value creation. It includes a seminar discussion with set readings as well as a practice-led component on “landscape prediction.” Participants will experiment with relevant machine learning techniques and speculate upon the entanglement of visual media with the surfaces of the planet. They will explore how predictive images of the Earth can affect ground-level operations, and how the surfaces of the planet can extend this visual archive.

    The workshop was run together with Ryan Bishop, Mihaela Brebenel and Jussi Parikka, part of the Archaeologies of Media and Technology research group.